Instructions to Authors

(See also the Final Submission Checklist)

1. Submitting Manuscripts

Human Technology accepts on an ongoing basis manuscripts meeting the aim and the scope of the journal. (see the Mission Statement)

Manuscripts (written in good English) should be submitted as an email attachment (in Microsoft Word or RTF format) to Editor in Chief Päivi Häkkinen at humantechnology@jyu.fi. No paper versions are needed. All manuscripts in the publication process will be evaluated by an online anti-plagiarism program and a double-blind peer review process. Papers accepted for publication are subjected to copy editing.

2. Legal Requirements

By submitting an article to Human Technology, authors guarantee that their article is original and not under consideration currently for publication elsewhere. In addition, the authors guarantee that co-authors, if any, have approved of the manuscript and have agreed to submit it to Human Technology. Finally, the authors must guarantee that the responsible authorities (tacit or explicit) at the institution where the work has been carried out are aware of and approve of the potential publishing of the manuscript associated with their organization.

If figures or texts passages included in the manuscript have been published previously, the authors are required to obtain (and submit to Human Technology) reprint permission from the original author and all copyright holders prior to the publishing of such material in Human Technology. Any materials received without such copyright permissions will be assumed to be the original work of the authors.

Authors retain the copyright to their articles (see also the Copyright information). Prior to the publication, authors must sign an "Author’s Warranty and Publication Agreement" [download]. In addition, authors acknowledge that no compensation for the manuscript will be given.

3. Review, revisions, and proofing process

Human Technology has a specified process for the review and revision of articles in preparation for publication. For information on the typical editorial process, see the editorial policy and review process description.

Prior to publication, corresponding authors will receive a PDF version of their manuscript for final proofing. Proofreading of this final manuscript is the responsibility of the author and must be done within 72 hours. The author is entitled to formal corrections of the manuscript only. Substantial changes in content (new results, corrected values, changes in title and/or authorship) are not permitted without the approval of the editor in chief.

Authors must sign the "Author’s Warranty and Publication Agreement" and send it to the publisher by postal service (together with necessary copyright permissions) at the same time as the final proofing of the accepted manuscript is managed by e-mail. If the signed agreement cannot reach Finland by mail within a week, a faxed signed copy [the fax number is provided on the last page of the Agreement] should be sent immediately and the original signed version dispatched by postal service.

4. Manuscript Preparation Details

(For a PDF version of both the preparation details and the checklist, click here.)

Articles submitted to Human Technology for consideration may be written in any recognized publication format. However, if the article is accepted into the publication process, all revised versions must be written within Human Technology’s editorial style guidelines for citations, references and English language, a modified version of the style presented in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed. is preferred, 5th ed. is acceptable), [referred to here as the APA Manual]. Most elements of Human Technology’s editorial style that differ from APA style are provided below. See also the Final Submission Checklist.

Please follow these instructions carefully. Final manuscripts that do not fit the specifications provided may be returned for reformatting or revision.

Papers should be organized (see details on each item below) as follows:

  1. Title of the article, the running title, authorship, and affiliation
  2. Abstract and keywords/phrases
  3. The main body text, including in-text citations (with endnotes, if necessary)
  4. Reference List
  5. Author’s Note (if appropriate) and Correspondence contact information
  6. Appendixes, if needed
  7. Tables, figures and illustrations, numbered and in the order of mention in the article, with accompanying title/caption information.

1. Title and authorship

Begin the paper with the title of the manuscript (informative but succinct) in all capitalized letters. Include a running headline for your article (maximum 50 characters, including punctuation and spaces) drawn from the title of your paper, which will run at the top of the internal pages. Follow the title with the full name(s) of the author(s), with the primary author first, and the affiliation (department and institution/organization and country) of each author.

2. Abstract and keywords

Each manuscript must include an abstract, 120–150 words in length, that presents the significant issues and findings of the paper. Define any abbreviations included in the abstract. Following the abstract, supply 4 to 6 keywords/phrases that characterize the scope of the paper and which can be used for indexing purposes.

3. Body of Text

The style of an article involves several distinct areas, each of which is important to present clearly and accurately. Please implement these style guidelines specifically.

Editorial style

For editorial style issues for Human Technology articles not specifically addressed in this document or the APA Manual, please refer to the Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition). Questions regarding spelling, abbreviations, and foreign phrases should be referred to Webster's Third New International Dictionary.

Each paragraph must include at least two sentences. Please organize the material so that paragraphs clearly lead the reader through the article’s key points, without unnecessary repetition or loss of continuity.

Technical style

Human Technology publishes its articles in a one column format. Please prepare manuscripts likewise, with the following margins:

Top margin: 3.8 cm for A4 paper (1.5 inches for USA letter size)
Side margins: 2.54 cm (1 inch)
Bottom margin: 3.7 cm (.75 inch)

There is no minimum or maximum length designated for papers published in Human Technology, However, the entire document, including all illustrations and tables, should be no larger than 3MB. Zip files of the final manuscript are accepted.

All texts, including the title, author's note, and references, should be presented single-spaced, with the body of the text fully justified (straight margins on the left and right). Do not double space between paragraphs. The text body font used for Human Technology is Times New Roman, 12 points.

Use the software program’s automatic page numbering for the manuscript. Place the number in the center of the footer.

When structuring your article, use three or fewer layers of headings (in addition to the title). Do not create the heading structure through a formatting process in the software. Please do it manually. The headings should be organized as follows:

ARTICLE TITLE (centered, bold, 15-point Arial font, all capitalized)

LEVEL 1 HEADING (centered, bold, 12-point Arial, all capitalized)

Level 2 Heading (uppercase only major words [no prepositions fewer than 4 letters], bold, 12-point Arial, flush left)

Level 3 Heading (uppercase only major words [no prepositions fewer than 4 letters], indented, 12-point Arial)

Do not indent the first paragraph after a heading; all other paragraphs are indented. Use the software’s manual tab. Do not indent by using the space bar, and do not program the formatting to create indentations automatically.

Do not adjust the visual presentation of your document by using any additional formatting options within your software program beyond its standard (basic) functions. All formatting for visual appeal will be done during the layout phase.

Language style

Please be sure the manuscript is written in good English, and organized in a coherent, easy to follow style. Papers lacking adequate language or organizational quality may be returned to the author for improvement in the appropriate areas.

Key terms used in the document should be italicized on first use only. Because this is an interdisciplinary journal, terms not easily identifiable by persons from diverse fields of study should be defined on first use, even if they are common knowledge in the author’s field.

Use abbreviations only if it will help clarify comprehension within the article. Abbreviations in a figure must be explained either in a caption or in the legend. For tables, the abbreviation must be explained either in the table title (if the title includes words that are abbreviated within the body of the table) or in the table notes. The abbreviation must be explained in every table or figure it is used. However, in the body of the text, once an abbreviation is introduced, only the abbreviation should be used in subsequent text (never the full words).

Do not hyphenate words unless it is part of its normal spelling (e.g., self-esteem, on-line). Turn off the automatic hyphenation option on your word processor. Do not hyphenate words at the end of the screen line: Any hyphenation needed to even line lengths during final layout of the manuscript will be managed as part of the editorial process. Because the hyphenation of words is determined by how the word is used within the context of the sentence, rely on Webster's Third New International Dictionary for guidance.

Human Technology does not use footnotes, but rather endnotes, noted within the body of the text by superscript Arabic numerals, and in the endnotes section with normal size numbers followed by a period and the material. Use endnotes sparingly. However, all texts that require reprint permission should be acknowledged with an endnote indicating such permission from the copyright owner(s), with copies of such permission submitted to the managing editor of Human Technology. See the APA Manual for more information on securing copyright reprint permission.

Scientific style

Human Technology uses the metric system for physical measurements, based on the International System of Units (SI). For experiments not conducted in metric units, author(s) may provide the non-metric units, with the SI equivalent following in parentheses.

Please verify that any statistical information included is correct, and accurately and clearly presented. Use standard abbreviations (see APA Manual) when presenting data.

In-text reference style

All direct and indirect quotes of others’ work must be properly cited, including page number. Direct quotes over 40 words should be presented in block form, rather than within quotation marks inside the body of the text. Quotations from individuals that are drawn from one’s data should be italicized, and comply with either the in-text or block quotation styles.

For in-text citations, follow the APA Manual: author(s)’ last name, followed by the source’s year of publication and, if citing a direct or indirect quote, the page numbers. When multiple citations are presented simultaneously, citations are listed in alphabetical order, based on the last name of the first author. Three examples are provided here; please consult the APA Manual for details on other types of citations.

  • If the author(s) is(are) mentioned in the body of the text, the citation would be:

    According to Axel, Smith, Parker and Bradenton (1997)... [used for first citation in text; used as Axel et al. (1997) in subsequent mentions]

  • If the author(s) is not mentioned by name in the body of the text, the citation would be:

    ... as previous studies have shown (Axel, Smith, Parker & Bradenton, 1997; Collingswood, in press; Paleceed & Barselle, 1977). [used for first citation in text; used as (Axel et al., 1997, Collingswood, in press; Paleceed & Barselle, 1977) on subsequent mentions]

  • If you are directly quoting from a source, you need to provide the page number where the quote can be found. It might look like this:

    According to Axel, Smith, Parker and Bradenton (1997, p. 332), "The data indicates ...," and this has been suggested as well by other researchers (see, Collingswood, in press; Paleceed & Barselle, 1977, chap. 5).

For sources that have three to five authors, list all authors on first reference, and the first author and et al. on subsequent citations (e.g., Carlyle, Kahlil, Tennenbaum, Bristol, & Schank, 2004, on first reference, and Carlyle et al., 2005 for subsequent citations).

For citations drawn from the Internet, treat the source in the typical citation form within the body of the text (name of Web source’s organization, publication date, and, if needed, page/paragraph number). The URL is to be provided in the reference listing. See the paragraph that addresses Internet references in Section 4 below for further information.

4. Reference List

Unlike the APA Manual, Human Technology requires the references at the end of the article to be single-spaced. In addition, Human Technology requests that all authors of a source be listed, even if there a multitude of authors. Finally, if the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and/or the Uniform Resource Name (URN) of any cited literature is available, please include it with the reference material.

Please verify that the reference list includes only citations from within the body of the text and all citations within the text are also found in the reference list. Be sure all names and words are spelled correctly, and the date of publication is correct. A couple of examples for references are provided here; more detailed examples, including for citations of electronic, audio and visual materials, can be found in the APA Manual. Please follow those guidelines carefully.

Sources presented in the reference list should be listed in alphabetical order of the surname of the first author; multiple titles by the same author should be presented in chronological order.

  • If the source is a journal article by one author, the reference listing would be:

    Beilharz, R. G., & Cox, D. F. (1967). Social dominance in swine. Animal Behavior, 15, 117–122.

  • If the source is an article by one author that is in contained within an edited book, the reference listing would be:

    Huesmann, L. R. (1998). The role of social information processing and cognitive schema in the acquisition and maintenance of habitual aggressive behavior. In R. G. Green & E. Donnerstein (Eds.), Human aggression: Theories, research, and implications for social policy (pp. 73–109). San Diego, CA, USA: Academic Press.

  • If the source is a manuscript by several authors that has been accepted for publication but not yet printed, the reference listing would be:

    Jasinskaja, L., Leibkind, K., Horenczyk, G., & Schmitz, P. (in press). The interactive nature of acculturation: Perceived discrimination, acculturation attitudes and stress among young ethnic repatriates in Finland, Israel and Germany. International Journal of Intercultural Relations.

  • Regarding proceedings drawn from conferences, seminars, workshops and the like, if the material is drawn from printed proceedings, then treat the reference as a chapter from an edited book:

    Andersen, P. B. (1999). Elastic interfaces: Maritime instrumentation as an example. In J. M. Hoc, P. Millot, E. Hollnagel, & P. C. Cacciabue (Eds.), Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Cognitive Science Approaches to Process Control (CSAPC’99; pp. 35–41). Valenciennes, France: Presses Universitaires de Valenciennes.

    If the source is not published, then one of these two options may be most appropriate:

    Clancy, C. (2005, October). Health information technology, quality of care and evidence-based medicine: An interlinked triad. Presentation given at the Annual Symposium, American Medical Informatics Association, Washington, DC. Retrieved March 27, 2006, from http://www.ahrq.gov/news/sp102505.htm

    Mäkeläinen, B., Nurminen, M., Reijonen, P., & Torvinen, V. (1996, August). Everyday use between success and failure: Making sense with onion layers. Paper presented at the 19th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS), Lokeberg, Sweden.

Please note that, in most cases, only the first letter of the first word of a title (and the first word after the colon in a compound title) is capitalized. Titles of journals and books, and the volume numbers of journals, are italicized. Issue numbers of journals are needed only for journals in which each issue of a volume year starts with page 1; if the page numbers in the issues build throughout the course of the volume year, the issue number is not to be included.

For references drawn from the Internet, please provide the complete URL for the actual Web page to which you are referring. Do not place a period after the URL. Provide a retrieval date for the citation, and check prior to publication that the URL is still active. For direct quotes, provide the paragraph number. Regarding a Web page’s publication date, use either the copyright date or the last updated date. If neither of these exists, provide the notation n.d. (no date) as your publication year.

Prepare the reference list with a hanging indent (first line is flush, subsequent lines are indented). Create this only through the use of the formatting option in Word; do not use the spacebar to create the indentations. Please verify the correct spelling of each element of the reference listing, and that the dates of publication and page spread (if needed) are correct. All locations for publishers must include the city (and, if required, state/province), followed by the country. Abbreviate only the USA and UK. Be sure the publisher’s name is complete.

5. Author’s Note

Any author’s note (if needed) should be as brief as possible. It is within this note that the author mentions any grant support (with the names of the funding organizations provided in full), notes previous uses of the material contained in the manuscript, acknowledges individuals who provided significant assistance in the preparation of the manuscript, and addresses any perceived conflict of interest.

All manuscripts should include the name and address for correspondence (email and postal addresses) for the contact author. Please use the phrasing—All correspondence should be addressed to,— followed by the corresponding author’s full name and addresses.

6. Appendixes

Include appendixes only if they provide essential information not possible within the body of the article. Please consult the APA Manuals for titling of appendixes.

7. Figures, Illustrations and Tables

Manuscripts should use visual elements only to clarify or expound the text. All figures and tables are to be able to “stand alone,” which means a reader can understand fully what is being communicated by the table or figure without having to read the article. Sufficient titling, captioning and legends make this goal possible.

Figures, illustrations and tables should be created using the Arial font, 10 pts. (8 points is the minimum; 12 points is the maximum). All lines used in figures and tables must be thick enough to be easily viewed. Visual elements must fit within the designated margins of the page: the maximum width is 16 cm (6.25 in.) and the maximum length is 22.2 cm (8.75 in). Color is permitted in creating charts, graphs, and figures, but the clarity of the figure must also be apparent when the figure is printed in black & white.

All illustrations (line art, photographs, graphs, or diagrams) and tables should be cited in the text (numbered consecutively as they are mentioned, even if they are not addressed in depth until later in the article). Figure parts (several small figures or images that compose an interrelated image) should be identified with lower-case Roman letters and positioned in relation to each other. All components of illustrations, tables, and figure parts that form a specific visual element should be electronically grouped together (meaning that the full visual element should be able to be moved as a unique and complete entity). Legends, if necessary, must be positioned within the body of the graph.

Any scanned images (line art, or b/w or color photographs) should be created with high enough resolution (300 dpi is the minimum recommended) to see the necessary detail in a PDF version of the document on the computer screen and printed. Scanned images must be saved in either JPEG or TIFF formats.

Vector graphics created in a separate graphics program should be exported into an EPS file and then imported into the Word or RTF document. The EPS files must always contain a preview of the figure in TIFF format.

Tables should be presented with a table title (table number followed by title with major words capitalized) centered above the table and, if needed, a caption underneath (flush left). All forms of figures should provide a caption (figure number, followed by caption, with only the first word of each sentence capitalized) centered below the figure.

If a figure includes photographic images in which people are visually identifiable, it is the responsibility of the authors to obtain permission of the persons for their images to be published in Human Technology. Please submit a copy of those photo agreements with the Author’s Warranty paperwork.

Final Submission Checklist

Please be sure the submission of the final manuscript meets the standards provided in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed. is preferred, 5th ed. is acceptable) [referred to here as APA Manual], with the exceptions specifically for Human Technology noted in the Final Manuscript Preparation Details.

  • Is the manuscript organized with the required elements in the following order:
    • manuscript’s title
    • manuscript’s running title (50 characters maximum, including punctuation and spaces)
    • the names and affiliations of all authors
    • a 120–150 word abstract
    • 4–6 keywords/phrases
    • the body of the text
    • endnotes (if needed)
    • reference list
    • author’s note (if needed) and correspondence information
    • appendixes (if needed)
    • and tables (with titles) and figures (with captions) in sequential order.
  • Is the manuscript text provided in single-spaced, one-column format?
  • Are the margins as specified? (For A4, 3.8 cm at the top; 3.7 at the bottom; and 2.54 on each side. For USA letter1.5 in. at the top; .75 at the bottom; and 1 on each side)?
  • Is the font used for manuscript text portions 12-point Times New Roman and the text fully justified?
  • Are all pages numbered (centered in the footer)?
  • Are tabs created through the software program and not through the space bar?
  • Is the hyphenation option turned off in the software program?
  • If the text contains endnotes, are they noted appropriately within the article and specified at the end of the text?
  • Are all direct and indirect quotes cited properly (author, publication date, and page number) and included in the reference list?
  • Are the reference citations in the text created to meet the standards provided by the APA Manual and correspond exactly with their counterparts in the Reference List?
  • Are the headings used created according to the Human Technology style, in 12-point Arial, created without use of the software's formatting option and reflect the organization of the article?
  • Are abbreviations used only when necessary and properly defined?
  • Are statistics and symbols used according to APA Manual standards?
  • Are all measurements, other than time, provided in metric standards or provided with metric equivalents if nonmetric units were used in the experiment?
  • Are locations for tables and illustrations noted clearly within the text?
  • Are all statistical texts and abbreviations presented clearly, accurately, and in correct form?
  • Is the reference list prepared according to the Human Technology format (modified APA Manual style: alphabetical order by surname, italics for publications, page numbers when needed, etc.)? Are URLs for any Internet references still active?
  • Do all references in the reference list have a mention in an in-text citation within the body of the text?
  • Are issue numbers used only for journals in which each issue of a volume starts with page 1?
  • Is an author's note needed? If so, does it follow the stated guidelines?
  • Have you included correspondence information (contact name, email address and postal address) for the author of contact?
  • Are all tables and illustrations created using Arial font, 8-12 points and details of images and text sharp enough to see/read both in print form and on the screen?
  • Are all illustrations and tables numbered consecutively as they are mentioned in the text and properly titled/captioned?
  • Are any abbreviations used fully explained in the legend, title or note?
  • If needed, has written permission to reprint copyrighted materials (texts, tests, tables or illustrations), in whole or in part, been secured by the author and submitted to Human Technology?
  • If needed, has written permission been secured for individuals within photographs in which they are visually identifiable?